Online learning leaves some students unmotivated, struggling

Learning at the kitchen table- 

Senior Andrew Hernandez does his school work at home. Hernandez said he often loses motivation to keep up with his classes while at home.

Learning at the kitchen table- Senior Andrew Hernandez does his school work at home. Hernandez said he often loses motivation to keep up with his classes while at home.

Virtual learning is the new routine for most students, but for some, it’s a struggle to participate in. Going back to school during the pandemic is requiring students to attend school virtually. Although in-person schooling is now available, it is a risk most students aren’t willing to take, which leaves the majority of students stuck in online school with little to no structure.

“I felt disgusted, the type of disgust as if I saw past mistakes,” freshman Rene Moreno said. “I finally decided to get on BLEND but I’m reminded of all the piled up assignments I have to do. I haven’t even learned anything. I tried to do one assignment then after that one assignment, I gave up. It’s like folding laundry, once you fold one shirt, and you see how many are left, you wanna stop.”

It’s hard to hear that my students are struggling on both a personal level and professional level”

— Gina Hinojosa (Theater Teacher)

The learning at home is a stark contrast from coming into school every day which leads to confusion and procrastination. However, students are expected to complete a similar amount of work despite the circumstances.

“I feel like some of my teachers have assigned too much,” senior Andrew Hernandez said. “I do like just one class and I probably get two or three assignments that need to be done like by the end of the day. And sometimes I just don’t feel motivated to do the work in some of my classes.”

Teachers also realize the difficulty students are facing and hope to be a guide for any situation the students are experiencing. Although teachers are there to help they are also facing problems of their own.

“It’s hard to hear that my students are struggling on both a personal and professional level,” theater teacher Gina Hinojosa said. “I became a teacher during a pandemic to help to promote a sense of normalcy in a very weird time. There’s a certain point where we, as teachers and humans, have to remind ourselves that being there for our students along with a little kindness goes a long way, even if their cameras are off.”

Even with the help provided, some students struggle with work on a deeper level. In-person teaching is known to have many advantages compared to virtual learning, which is often limited by technology and Internet access.

“I haven’t been able to pass my classes because some of the work is kind of confusing…,” senior Andrew Hernandez said.

“For example, one of my teachers makes us take quizzes, and the quizzes require notes and I don’t write my notes that well or I don’t memorize the subject very good. … For me personally, it will be just communicating with all the teachers cause we’re not seeing them face to face, or asking them questions about the assignments.”

Whether reaching out is helpful for the students or not, the teachers make it clear that they understand the hardships of this new learning experience the students are going through. Teachers urge students to ask for help when needed.

“You are not alone,” Hinojosa said. “We are all living through this and trying to find our way, some may find it faster than others, but it doesn’t mean it’s going to be this way forever.”