Students have mixed feelings about getting vaccinated

Natalia Estrada, Editor

As the school year begins, more health experts have seen an increase in vaccinations of COVID-19 among Texas age groups, especially in the past six weeks for 12 to 18 years-olds.

COVID-19 cases started to decrease as the vaccines of Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson were being distributed all over the country. But after 9 months since the first vaccine was provided, about 46% of 12 to 15-year-olds, who have been eligible to get the Pfizer vaccine, have received a shot. And roughly 55 percent of the group age 16-and 17-year-olds have been vaccinated, according to the data of the Texas Health and Human Services Department.

But now I have changed my mind because protecting my baby was my priority and I do not want the COVID-19 to affect me if I ever get it, that is why I and my family have decided to get vaccinated.”

— Anonymous Akins student

Students at Akins have been discussing reasons why they do not want to get vaccinated or why they decided to get the COVID-19 vaccine after months, and how other people’s opinions have influenced their decisions. The Eagle’s Eye has changed their names to help them feel comfortable speaking freely.

Senior Dulce Salaz has been doing online school due to her pregnancy and because of the high rate of COVID cases at school. She never thought of getting the vaccine because she did not feel secure about it but now that her mom and in-laws have been vaccinated, she has decided to get vaccinated.

“At first, I was scared of getting sick from the vaccine or that the COVID-19 vaccine could affect my pregnancy or that it could not be as effective as the health department says to protect people,” Salaz said. “But now I have changed my mind because protecting my baby was my priority and I do not want the COVID-19 to affect me if I ever get it, that is why I and my family have decided to get vaccinated.”

Senior Romina Diaz has been protecting herself because she does believe that the virus of COVID-19 is dangerous, but she still decided to not get the COVID-19 vaccine due to different events that have happened in her life.

“I do not believe that the COVID-19 vaccine is safe or effective because it was approved in a short period, while other vaccines in the past have been approved after years,” Diaz said. “My uncle got the Moderna vaccine in June 2021 and after two weeks he passed away, it started with symptoms of COVID-19, and then suddenly he had to be in the emergency room because he could not breathe on his own, that is why I am afraid of dying which is why I decided not to get vaccinated,” Romina Diaz said.

Salaz said she does believe it is important for everyone to do their part to protect each other. “I know that some students are going to take keep their opinion on not wanting to get vaccinated and we should respect that decision, but at the same time I think it is important to still wear a mask at school to protect our friends,” she said